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Stop Stressing - Just Say No

As many people have commented at one time or another, we could get so much more done if there were just more hours in the day. Obligations pile up everywhere: duties at work, commitments to social groups, quality time with the family and time out to spend with friends… For whatever reason, there always seems to be some kind of demand (or worse, a polite request) on our time. Yet this wishing for more time in the day is missing the real point of the problem, which is actually quite different.

What's the problem, then?


Stop Stressing - Getting Away from Should

People like to have a sense of purpose about things. We want to know that we're doing the right thing, and that our activities are going along according to "the plan." In short, we spend a lot of time either saying "I should..." or asking ourselves "what should I..."


Stop Stressing: Visualize Success

Our vivid imaginations often have the power to alleviate or exacerbate stressful situations. On the one hand, we can come up with a lot of different solutions for the same problems; yet on the other, we also can create all manner of roadblocks for ourselves almost out of thin air.


Stop Stressing - Do, Defer, Delegate

Sometimes the problem that we're dealing with isn't necessarily a matter of the stress itself, but rather the way we're approaching it. After all, we can't lay all the blame on outside forces - we do make our own problems just as often.

Fortunately, this also means that we can correct those same problems that we've made. Most of the difficulties we find ourselves engineering are easily controlled and modified with a bit of careful effort.


Stop Stressing - Stressors and Themes

We've talked about stress and the elements that bring it into our lives, or stressors. Identifying our stressors can be a powerful first step, for obvious reasons - if we know what's giving us grief, we can take steps to put it out of our way, resolve it or come to terms with it. Even in the cases where we can't totally remove a stressor, such as a confrontational coworker, we can find ways to moderate its influence.


Stop Stressing - Just Say No

As many people have commented at one time or another, we could get so much more done if there were just more hours in the day. Obligations pile up everywhere: duties at work, commitments to social groups, quality time with the family and time out to spend with friends… For whatever reason, there always seems to be some kind of demand (or worse, a polite request) on our time. Yet this wishing for more time in the day is missing the real point of the problem, which is actually quite different.

What's the problem, then?


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