Career Opportunities in Financial Services

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The Financial Services sector is a good opportunity for a long term career choice, despite the current recession.

You do not need any formal qualifications to become employed in some roles within this Industry although there is an opportunity for ongoing training and development and good GCSE grades are certainly a requirement for the majority of roles.

Financial advisors and planners are employed to guide clients through their financial options, source the best
product and look to secure a sale. Some advise clients on a broad range of savings and insurance plans. Others are 'tied' and are allowed to sell only their own company's products. Independent financial advisers (IFAs) supply a variety of products from different suppliers.

Financial planners are less focused on sales, but look to the future, assess customers' lifestyles and support them through a range of financial decisions to help them achieve their personal goals.

Working hours often vary to fit around clients'circumstances. Some advisers work 9am to 5pm, Monday to
Friday, but flexible working is normal for many. Financial advisers and planners are office-based. IFAs often work from home, travelling to meet clients in their own homes.

There are jobs throughout the UK in insurance and investment firms, banks, building societies, estate agents, retailers and law firms. Many IFAs are self-employed, although they may have work agreements with companies.

Employers often look for two A levels and five GCSEs (A*-C), including English and maths, or equivalent qualifications. Personal qualities, including communication skills and the ability to relate well to other people, are also very important. School leavers usually start in a research, administrative or tied adviser role. It may be possible to train through an Apprenticeship.

There are jobs throughout the UK in insurance and investment firms, banks, building societies, estate agents, retailers and law firms. Many IFAs are self-employed, although they may have work agreements with companies.

Employers often look for two A levels and five GCSEs (A*-C), including English and maths, or equivalent qualifications. Personal qualities, including communication skills and the ability to relate well to other people, are also very important. School leavers usually start in a research, administrative or tied adviser role. It may be possible to train through an Apprenticeship.

Insurance brokers generally follow industry-specific professional qualifications offered by the Chartered
Insurance Institute, choosing units of study most relevant to their work area. Some brokers have to pass an Appropriate Exam if working in a regulated area.

With experince, brokers could specialise in a product area or move into account handling, claims broking, business development or related insurance fields like underwriting, loss adjusting or compliance. Chartered CII status can be achieved through study and three years' continuing professional development.

There are several Internet Job boards and Job sites advertising vacancies in the Financial Services Industry.

About the Author:

Louise G is a prolific business author and business consultant. Louise has been instrumental in the development of successful marketing strategies for many leading internet businesses. Examples of Louises work can be found at http://jobsno1.co.uk for the site for UK Jobs.

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